Where Do Insects Go During the Winter?

Here’s a little entomology humor for you: What does the stinkbug say to the ladybug in the fall? “Let’s go inside, I’m so over winter.”

The weather is getting cooler. Where do the bugs go? Overwintering insects, such as stinkbugs, seek warmth and shelter to survive. We know that they like to go inside homes and other buildings, but in 2013, as part of a project called “The Great Stinkbug Count,” USDA scientists surveyed forests along the Appalachian Trail in Maryland and West Virginia, using trained canines, and found that they also like large, dry dead trees, with oak and locust being their preferred type. It was also learned that homes in more wooded areas experienced a higher number of overwintering stinkbugs than homes in more urban settings. In our region, we are accustomed to seeing stinkbugs inside as they overwinter. And they can get in without you noticing. Openings in screens and screen doors, gaps in pipes, and virtually any known entrance to your home is inviting to them. However, they are not the only insects who like to go inside.

Ladybugs will gather together to stay warm and can be found in sun-filled areas in your home. They prefer light-colored homes with southwestern exposure.

Centipedes will come indoors, and head down to your basement where it’s cool and moist. Unlike other overwintering insects who slow down during these months, centipedes continue to hunt other bugs and can actually be beneficial, (even though they are creepy).

Wasps can also overwinter. Typically if you find one in your home, it is a queen who is looking for shelter and will be dormant until she can go outside in the spring to create a new colony. She will seek out a quiet area like your basement, or behind a baseboard and unless threatened, will be largely inactive.

Given how these insects have had years of adapting to conditions and surroundings, they are hard to spot when they come in. Many people don’t even realize they have them in their homes over the winter. Triple S has over 35 years of experience inspecting homes for overwintering insects and can help you determine if you have these insects in your home, and where they might be coming from. Call today for your free inspection: 800-457-3685.

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